BOOK REVIEW
TITLE: Everywhere, Everything, Everyone
AUTHOR: Katy Warner
PUBLISHER: Hardie Grant Egmont
GENRE: Young Adult Dystopian Fiction
REVIEWER: Olivia Clinckers

Katy Warner’s debut novel, Everywhere, Everything, Everyone, is an exciting mix of rebellion and romance. It is perfect for fans of 1984 by George Orwell and Divergent by Veronica Roth.

14-year old Santee lives in the supposedly ‘bad side’ of town but is smart enough to go to one of the best private schools on the ‘good side’, with her sister Astrid. She lives in a world of rules, there is a curfew every night and if you are caught out after the curfew, you are taken away by ‘the Unit’. People keep watch on their neighbours and report them to the government if they thought they were ‘Potential Threats’, ie not following the rules or acting ‘normal’.

 

This novel captivated me from the first sentence. I feel that this is one of the few dystopian YA books where the protagonist is not ‘special’; Santee is a perfectly normal teenager. She has flaws, like we all do, and I feel that this helps the reader connect more to her. Santee must navigate the complexities of high school and has Tash, her old best friend who turned on Santee when her dad was taken away by the Unit. No one knows why he was taken away, but everyone at her school knows and judges her for it. Tash bullies Santee and tries to make her life as miserable as possible.

 

Another aspect I love about this book is the romance. It is simple and sweet, there isn’t much going on and I feel that this stays true to Katy’s writing of the teens in this book – it wasn’t unrealistic. Santee and Z’s friendship is unexpected but sweet and I love the dynamic between them. Santee meets him at a roadblock on her way to school, people are milling around and she hears someone exclaim, “I bet it’s one of them, from over there, causing all this trouble”, and Santee breaks her own rules and snaps at this lady, and the crowd turns on her and acts like she is a ‘threat’. Santee runs, and Z follows, showing her a detour to safety.

 

Santee is swept into a world of rebellion; Z calls the Unit and all the rules, the ‘Regime’, and saying that is enough to get you thrown in prison for the rest of your life. This reminds me of what is happening in our world today, in North Korea, China, Hong Kong, Russia etc. I love the integration of real-world aspects in this book!

Finally, I would like to say that this is one of my favourite reads of 2019, it was exciting and dangerous, and is written amazingly! I am 100% ready for the sequel!

in partnership with